59
Comments (18)
sorted by:
25
yoisi [S] 25 points ago +25 / -0

And apparently some people were still upset even after the English version was changed because they were upset it was kept in the Japanese version

19
fake_namington 19 points ago +19 / -0

The Fat-Mads are Mad, you say?

10
newcountt 10 points ago +10 / -0

Mostly trans fats.

4
cccpneveragain 4 points ago +4 / -0

Didn't they ban trans fat in the US? Needs to apply here too.

17
Steampunk_Moustache 17 points ago +17 / -0

This is actually amazing.

They removed all direct reference to the queen being either beautiful or ugly.

They altered the lines "I actually kind of liked the way she was before." and "I actually kinda like her even looking like that."

So not even this guy discovering his inner Pierce Brosnan was good enough.

No opinion on her appearance is allowed.

11
Xzal 11 points ago +11 / -0

As a slight aside. They're really butchering the storytelling, changing Smooth-Smooth Stones name to ... "smooth gem".

Outright TELLING the viewer what will happen if it's not returned instead of implying.

All the subtlety of a sledge hammer.

13
APDSmith 13 points ago +13 / -0

People like this lot don't have the capability to write good text. Correcting them in the learning stages would have been problematic.

So yeah, they're turning well-written stuff into an abomination because they literally know no better. They probably think this virtue-signalling-laden drek is better because while it's soulless porridge, it's ideologically-compliant soulless porridge.

7
cccpneveragain 7 points ago +7 / -0

I've been trying to learn Japanese and while I'm still awful and essentially have to break down sentences on paper and look stuff up. It's interesting though because the second reference to the slim queen shows how intentional it is. It would have been to just call her joo-sama (queen) just like in the English but they made a point of adding the slim part again as if they wanted to emphasize it.

That "Smooth Smooth Stone" part is just stupidity. That's very clearly written in Japanese as if it's the name for something special. If you wanted to write smooth gem or smooth stone it wouldn't be like that.

1
Cazarosta 1 point ago +1 / -0

Are you using any other particular methods to learn it?

2
cccpneveragain 2 points ago +2 / -0

Not really. I've tried all those gimmicky type things before on other languages but I have never had any success with any of that learning sticking. I do use duolingo, but mainly for nothing other than hiragana/katakana flash cards because the alphabet is so huge and that app offers a lot of repetition for the alphabet.

Otherwise, I just have taken the approach I'd say a kid uses, I learn to break up sentences into words and then look up the words. I've got a few Japanese manga and I'll go through a couple pages and read it every day. It takes me forever, but I'm thinking I can actually have success because the volume of available Japanese media is very high, so there's a lot of immersion opportunity. I'm hoping to play through a game later this year, starting with something I already know well so I'm not totally lost.

1
Cazarosta 1 point ago +1 / -0

Ah so immersion. I was already greatly considering that form of learning. If I were to ever learn it I'll do that and I suppose add in that breaking up sentences thing you're doing.

2
cccpneveragain 2 points ago +2 / -0

With there being no spaces in written text in Japanese, I sort of have had to learn to bust up sentences. It seems like a fairly simple language otherwise, with the real hard work being just the sheer volume of characters. I don't know but a tiny handful of kanji, and I think they say a kid who has finished grade school should know around 1000. I think that will come though as I get better and spending less time on figuring out the sentences. A lot of manga use the furigana (it's kanji represented in the hiragana alphabet) too, so that helps. Except I'm too old to read it half the time without a magnifying glass. Japanese kids must have damn good eyesight.

1
Cazarosta 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yeah a lot of manga aimed at children has furigana in it, like Naruto for example, since they might not know the kanji.

Recently I tried listening to an anime I had already watched without subtitles and I was amazed that I was able to pick up a phrase or word about every other sentence. I should really discipline myself and start learning.

5
IamM 5 points ago +5 / -0

Didn't they do the same with ocarina of time because it at one point mentioned communism and christianity? I remember seeing an article about it a while back to that effect.

5
RoulerBleu 5 points ago +5 / -0

A whale got offended by Japanese dialogs and behaved unprofessionally.

Japan still hunts whales, now we know why.

1
deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
1
LaptopWillEatThisAcc 1 point ago +1 / -0

An interesting thing about Nintendo's 3DS games is that a lot of them had localisation differences between the NA and PAL versions, such that there's basically two "English" versions. I remember seeing that the NA version of Tri Force Heroes, for example, had a Doge reference. Fire Emblem: Awakening had mostly minor differences, but its handling of the Summer Scramble DLC was schizophrenic; even though the NA version covered up a picture of Tharja in a bikini by adding a towel, it also kept a conversation about her "boingy bits", which the PAL version changed to be about her hair instead.

Long tangent, but knowing that such differences exist makes me wonder if the same thing happened here. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find a solid confirmation of whether this game's PAL version does the same thing. The closest I could find is that someone in the comments of the article these screenshots are from asked, and the author said maybe, but couldn't confirm. I looked up a walkthrough and this apparently happens early in the game, so maybe I'll quickly make a new save to see.

Edit: the PAL version has no differences in this area.

1
deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0