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posted ago by Mpetey123 ago by Mpetey123 +15 / -0

I was talking to a buddy recently and he was telling me a story his kid made up about how the world was made. It made me think of hearing about an Aboriginal belief that they had to write down the name of everything in creation every year or it would disappear. Now I can't remember the exact story so I tried googling it and I'm finding nothing about it online. Am I wrong about the myth or just googling badly?

Comments (13)
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Grumman 10 points ago +10 / -0

I've never heard of that and I don't believe it to be true. Indigenous Australians were literally prehistoric before the arrival of Europeans, and the factual truth of that statement isn't in question. A culture that held the belief that it had to record everything for the sake of existence itself would have developed a historical record; they did not.

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FatalConceit 4 points ago +4 / -0

some historical events have become myth - take the Tale of the Nargun for instance. If read properly you can see that it's a story of how the aborigines burnt the scrublands to ward off the advancing glaciers. If read literally it seems like a story about Ice Giants lumbering across the land.

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Grumman 3 points ago +3 / -0

Maybe I found a different version, but the Nargun didn't sound like history-turned-myth to me. If you tell children that there's an invulnerable rock monster living in a cave, I'd assume you're just trying to scare them away from playing underground where they might get hurt or trapped.

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lgbtqwtfbbq 3 points ago +3 / -0

Arguably the modern West holds that belief today. How often will you see an individual deny something happened unless the claimant can provide evidence that it did?

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LibertyPrimeWasRight 1 point ago +1 / -0

Another twist is that it’s closer to true now than ever, when it comes to certain things. In the digital age, media can be so easily altered without leaving an original, unless a third party backs it up.

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deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
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DefinitelyNotIGN 8 points ago +8 / -0

A fascinating mythos, would make for an interesting fictional society, but... Aboriginals in most places, including Australia, predate written record.

So perhaps it is fitting you cannot re-find that myth, as clearly, they did not write it down since they had not yet invented writing, and so now it has ceased to exist.

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Mpetey123 [S] 4 points ago +4 / -0

That is funny, lol.

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NoEyesNoGroin 7 points ago +7 / -0

That'd be an interesting story for abos to have, given they were incapable of writing prior to colonisation.

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kinezumi 6 points ago +6 / -0

All of their history is basically Chinese whispers. Problem is, the left basically runs this country, so everything they say is taken at face value, which is why vast tracts of land are simply handed over to them with no questions asked.

I read an article recently indicating that the historical fact of their original migration to the country (because much as they'd argue otherwise, they're not technically indigenous to the island) won't be taught to students because it conflicts with their beliefs about their own origins.

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FatalConceit 4 points ago +4 / -0

The Dr. Parnassus film starts with a similar story - except in this case the devil tells them they can stop as it's pointless. Aboriginal Dreamtime Myths are localised - it's not 1 dreamtime across the country.

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Vicious_snek6 4 points ago +4 / -0

Aboriginal belief that they had to write down the name

They're not literate now, let alone before it was settled.

They go on about the '11' or '13' inventions all the time. One of them is a hollow stick, the other a bent one. They weren't literate. The myth you are thinking of is not aboriginal. It sounds like its from a fantasy novel, I recal something like it too...

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Smith1980 3 points ago +3 / -0

Interesting. I just know they have interesting concepts regarding dreams and dream time but didn’t know about that

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Mpetey123 [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

I might know about it either, haha. I wanted to confirm it online but I'm having no luck with it.